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BD House Pro
Tony Robles
A longtime teaching pro at Amsterdam Billiard Club in New York City, Tony has dozens of regional and national titles to his name, including the 2004 BCA Open Championships.


Instruction Articles:
• May 2014
Adapt to the Equipment


• Mar 2014
Turn The Beat Around


• Feb 2014
Straight Is Great


• Sept 2013
Cover the Basics


• June 2013
Getting It Right


• May 2013
Strength Training


• April 2013
Rust Proof?


• March 2013
Not So Fast


• February 2013
Two-Step Jump


• January 2013
Open Your Eyes


• December 2012
Feeling Good?


• November 2012
Hang In There


• October 2012
Back on Track


• September 2012
Straighten Up


• August 2012
On the Rail


• July 2012
Mental Checklists


• June 2012
Respect & Fear


• May 2012
Chin Music


• April 2012
On the Line


• March 2012
Balancing Act


• February 2012
Creative Drilling


• January 2012
Power Outage


• December 2011
Jumping In Line


• November 2011
Soft on Soft Breaking


• October 2011
Find Your Stroke


• September 2011
The Path Off the Rail


• August 2011
Short Position


• July 2011
Inch Along


• June 2011
Into the Unknown


• May 2011
Sharpened Focus


• April 2011
Never Flatline


• March 2011
Stop For A Review


• February 2011
One To Watch


• January 2011
The Straight Answer


• December 2010
Shoot The Lights Out


• November 2010
Never Overmatched


• October 2010
Drawing Conclusions


• September 2010
Through & Through


• August 2010
Along the Rail


• July 2010
The Small Stuff


• June 2010
Three in One


• May 2010
One Ball At a Time


• April 2010
Going Thin to Win


• March 2010
Know Your Game


• February 2010
14.1 For 8-Ballers


• January 2010
Setting It Straight


• December 2009
Hanging Out, Part II


• November 2009
Hanging Out


• October 2009
Control Your Speed


• September 2009
Busting Out of a Slump


• August 2009
Easy Errors, Part III


• June 2009
Easy Errors, Part I


• May 2009
Body Language & Breaking


• April 2009
The Break: Body Language


• March 2009
Must-Reads from Robles


• February 2009
Position: Four Square


• January 2009
Romancing the Stance


• October 2008
Look Out for Boingy Rails


• September 2008
Build a Better Break


• August 2008
Q&A: Ask the Pro


• July 2008
Buzz Kill: Stay Down


• June 2008
Stop Shots Safeties III


• May 2008
Stop Shots Part II


• April 2008
STOP-SHOT Safeties


• March 2008
How to Keep Winning


• February 2008
The Dreaded Straight-In Shot


• January 2008
Trying the Soft Break


• December 2007
The Hard Way Makes It Easier


• November 2007
How to Sight the Cue


• October 2007
Win from Your Chair


 
Easy Errors, Part II
July 2009
ONE OF the most common misconceptions I hear from beginning students concerns a the draw stroke. Again and again, Ill have a someone new to the game ask, Is it true that you get more draw on a shot when you pull the cue back right after it hits the cue ball?

Not only is this untrue, but its actually counterproductive to learning how to draw the cue ball properly. By pulling back after impact, you limit the amount of speed you can transfer to the cue ball, which limits the distance you can draw the ball. Also, to stop your cue after impact, you have to clench your back hand, which can cause a whole different set of problems.

When I work with my students, I tell them that there are a lot of people who mean well; but unfortunately, sometimes the information that they give out is so far off base its not even close to being true.

I was once instructing a fairly advanced player who believed that this abbreviated follow-through was the best way to create draw. When we started working on letting the cue travel through the cue ball, he told me that, when he was a kid, his grandfather said that he could rip the cloth if he ever followed through on a draw shot. So, he never followed through.

After 45 minutes of practice, I had him drawing the ball better than he had in his whole life. Sometimes its just a matter of letting go of bad habits.

As an exercise, set up a cue ball and object ball as shown in Diagram 1. The distance between the two balls should be about a foot. Also, make sure the shot is at a slight angle, so you can stroke through the ball without worrying about it coming straight back at you. Finally, mark the locations of the balls with a piece of chalk. After every shot, look to see where the tip of your cue came to a rest, this is the distance of your follow-through.

Also worth noting, there is not one magic distance you should aim for. The harder the shot, the longer the follow-through. The softer the shot, the softer it is.


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